Shopper Science: Meet Moms

by / Tuesday, 21 January 2014 / Published in Blog, Featured, Shopper Science, User Experience
First things first, meet Kate. She’s a mom of three boys. And a master of making order out of chaos. Kate exemplifies why, how and when moms shop online. She relies on pre-approved choices for the kids, in-the-moment access to selection and delivery to her doorstep.

Seriously meet her.

 

 

 

 

 

Kate is the qualitative to our Fluid Shopper Science quantitative. Fluid did a survey of 3000+ digital shoppers and then honed in on moms. There were a few stand-outs in the data. The three things you need to know now about moms + digital shopping….

1. Why moms buy online: Convenience, more choice, less chaos + cheaper.

These lead the reasons why moms purchase online vs. in-store. This “Select all that apply” question reveals the busy everyday lives of moms. Convenience is queen – with 61% answering they shop online because “It’s more convenient to get items shipped to my home.”

The full set of answers:

M.1

 

Implication for retailers: Streamline shopping paths to maximize the limited time moms have to make purchases. Moms don’t want to sit down, have coffee with you and chat. They want to make a purchase and get on with their day.

2. Top purchase triggers: Out grown, new season + wearing out the old.

When asked “Please rank the top 3 reasons for shopping for children’s stuff (non-essential items)” the top three were:
#1 27% “My children grew out of their old things”
#2 22% “It was the beginning of the season/back to school”
#3 15% “My children wore out their old things”
Of note: The answer chosen most was “My children needed something for a specific activity.”

The details of the responses can be seen here:

M.2

Implication for retailers: Past purchases hint at future purchases – especially when it comes to kids. Personalization and intelligent recommendations give you an advantage.

3. Kids + purchases: Yes kids influence purchase decisions.

75% of moms involve their children in the process of deciding what to buy. While ~30% decide together, the other ~44% put parameters around the choices they ask kids to make.

The chart details:

M.4

 

Implication for retailers: Curate collections of items to make decisions easier. Even better, suggest items based on triggers and information at hand – “back-to-school clothes for an 8-year-old boy” takes work out of the process for mom.

Given their purchasing power and influence we’ll hear more from, and about, moms this year. Stay tuned…

Go moms go,
Amy
[Shopper Science]

Tagged under: ,
TOP